Do Archaea Have Organelles? The first question that I am going to answer is “do archaea have organelles?” The answer is yes! Archaea are prokaryotic organisms, which means they do not have a membrane-bound nucleus. This does not mean that they lack organelles; in fact, the cell membrane of an archaeal organism has been found to be more similar to that of eukaryotes than it is to bacteria. Archeae also possess ribosomes and other components typically found in mitochondria or chloroplasts. I am going to answer the question “do archaea have organelles?” Yes, they do. Archaeae are prokaryotic organisms and therefore lack a membrane-bound nucleus that we see in eukaryotes such as animals or fungi. This does not mean that they lack organelles; in fact, their cell membranes resemble those of eukaryotes more than bacteria. Archeaea also possess ribosomes and other components typically found in mitochondria or chloroplasts. Next sentence: The Nucleus is too big for an archaeal organism’s size, so it could be considered a feature absent from all known members of this kingdom. Mitochondria can still exist because there is

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